Public Benefits : Subsidized Child Care

What kinds of child care subsidies are available in Ohio?

In Ohio, there are three types of child care subsidy.

  • Ohio Works First Child Care

  • Transitional Child Care

  • Publicly Funded Child Care

Each of these benefits are available to different groups of low income individuals who meet certain sets of criteria.

What does Ohio Works First Child Care provide?

Ohio Works First Child Care benefits are available to any family who is receiving Ohio Works First cash assistance and who engages in work activities.

Some of these activities include employment, engaging in the Work Experience Program (WEP), job search and job readiness, self-employment, subsidized employment, Learning Earning And Parenting (LEAP), vocational education or post-secondary education, job skills training or education related to employment and ABLE.

Who are Ohio Works First Child Care benefits available to?

Ohio Works First benefits are available to any family receiving OWF cash assistance who engages in certain work activities.

What does the Transitional Child Care program provide?

Transitional Child Care benefits may be provided to any family who meets a certain set of criteria. In order to be eligible, the family can no longer be eligible for the Ohio Works First program (OWF) for any reason, except if they are no longer on because of fraud or sanction they are not eligible.

The child care benefits, provided by Transition Child Care must be necessary to permit the caretaker to accept or maintain employment or attend school or attend training activities while working.

Families must not have a gross income that exceeds 150% of the federal poverty level. Benefits will end if the caretaker leaves their job without cause, at the end of 12 months, or when the income exceeds 165% of the federal poverty level.

How long do benefits from Transitional Child Care last?

Benefits can last up to 12 months.

Benefits will end when the caretaker leaves their job without cause, when the income exceeds 165% of the federal poverty level, or at the end of the 12 month period.

Who is eligible for Transitional Child Care?

If you are no longer eligible for OWF, you may be eligible for Transitional Child Care.

You must need child care benefits in order to maintain (or except) employment or schooling while employed.

If you had to leave OWF because of a fraud case or a sanction case, you are not eligible for Transitional Child Care.

When does the eligibility period begin for Transitional Child Care benefits?

The eligibility period for Transitional Child Care benefits begin the month following the last month that your family was eligible for OWF.

What does Publicly Funded Child Care provide?

Publicly Funded child care is available where the benefits are necessary to let the caretaker work and that person's income cannot exceed 150% of the federal poverty level when they start receiving the benefit.

Other families may be eligible depending upon the circumstances. Some of those cases would be:

  1. If child care benefits are necessary to permit the caretaker to enroll and participate in an education or training activity which prepares them for paid employment and whose monthly income does not exceed 150% of the federal poverty level, or

  2. Child care benefits are necessary in order for the applicant for OWF cash assistance participate in approved OWF activity, or

  3. Child care benefits are necessary for families who are sanctioned under OWF in order to participate in approved OWF activity, or

  4. Child care benefits are necessary for the family whose 12 months of Transitional Child Care benefits have expired and whose gross income does not exceed 150% of the federal poverty guideline.

How many days does it take to process an application?

It takes 30 days to process an application.

Where can I apply for child care funding?

One can apply at the County Department of Job and Family Services.

After 12 months, you must reapply.

What changes in eligibility must a family report?

Examples of changes a family must report include: change in family income, employment, participation in an education or training program, household composition, or relocation to another county.

See also the Forms & Education tab in this section for more information.

The information in this site is not intended as legal advice.
Back to Top of Page | Didn't find it? Use Advanced Search | Back to Step 1


Click here to find legal help near you.

To find a civil legal aid provider, call

1.866.LAW.OHIO (1.866.529.6446)



For the hearing impaired:
Use this site to find the local
Ohio legal aid provider in your
area. Then, call the Ohio Relay
Service at 1-800-750-0750 and
ask the service operator to
connect you to the provider
you are trying to call.


The information in this site is
not intended as legal advice.


 

Personal tools